May 31, 2022

Candles are Living Lights | Home Fragrance

by Candice Marzetz | Posted in: DÉCOR + HOME

Add ambiance and elevate your décor by displaying candles in monochromatic groupings in varying heights and diameters of three or more to create a candlescape.  I adore styling with over-sized unscented cathedral candles (the taller the better), unscented candles housed within glass hurricanes, and unscented clear glass votives sprinkled throughout a room will turn a dinner party into an event within minutes.


 

It’s patio season so why not, take your next outdoor garden party up a notch with thirty or more candles for a dramatic effect.  Light a pathway with hurricanes or greet your guest with a birdbath filled with votive candles. Dine alfresco with friends or get romantic with the one you love under the moon with a candle lit seaside picnic—the possibilities are endless.

While unscented candles are my go-to for creating candlescapes at home—I prefer to choose a home fragrance that is all-enveloping—I want the scent to impart a pleasant smell, evoke a feeling, and complement the room and the time of the day in which the candle will be aglow.  I like scents that remind me of places I’ve been, trips I’ve taken— places and gardens I’ve explored.  When selecting fragrances for clients I will often ask about their memories of favorite destinations and scents they find appealing to explore and suggest for their signature home fragrance scent(s).  I will often suggest one for day and one for night—and room by room we just might choose a different scent to capture a particular mood. I always curate a selection specifically to their needs and function with a distinct point of view.

I’m currently loving home fragrance ceramic vessels from Fornasetti and Gucci, and single-wick filled candles from Jo Malone (Pomegranate Noir is warm and inviting), Diptyque (Tubéreuse is always lovely), Tom Ford and Christian Dior.  Personally, I have my eye and nose fixed upon Jardin d’orangers by Christian Dior and a Gucci Black Herbarium candle for my next purchase.

Enjoy the living lights and finding your favorite home fragrance. Need help? Just ask.

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July 11, 2016

SPOONFUL OF STYLE

by Candice Marzetz | Posted in: DÉCOR + HOME

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I unearthed these Guilloché (gee-oh-SHAY) spoons at the Springfield Antiques & Flea Market on a rainy weekend in May. Having been on a cobalt kick for a while, the intensely brilliant blue one caught my eye— and then I spied the lemon yellow one minutes later at another booth.

Guilloché is a French word that means “engine turning,” and guilloche pieces are created by a machine similar to a lathe that engraves metal with a series of intricate, overlapping patterns. In the late 19th century, Imperial jeweler Carl Fabergé married guilloché engraving with colored enamel, and the trend took off all over Europe.

blue-guilloche-spoon-300-C&CoMy blue spoon is of Danish origin, and I’m still searching to determine the history of the yellow one. If you’ve seen one like it, or know anything about it, I’d love to hear from you. Until then, I’m just going to admire the interplay of colors and keep my eyes open for more of this gorgeous goodness at my next Flea…stay tuned.

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June 4, 2016

BRINGING IT HOME

by Candice Marzetz | Posted in: DÉCOR + HOME

Peonies-itty-bitty-garden

So, I got my peonies home from Red Twig Farms and got down to my favorite thing about flowers—arranging them!  I’m not a huge fan of glass vases; I don’t like seeing the stems, and the water gets gunky. So I reached for my trusty art deco creamware vase from Zanesville, Ohio’s own Shawnee Pottery. The Shawnee company opened in 1937, and their pieces are pretty easy to find at flea markets and antiques stores—many for a fairly reasonable price. Best of all, their matte finish and (usually) muted colors let the blossoms be the stars, which in my mind is kind of the point. If you’re out and about, keep your eyes open for Shawnee vases, as well as pieces from McCoy, Roseville, and Hull, which have a similar vibe.

And don’t feel like you have to be limited to vases! I use all sorts of vessels—whatever I find in the house—to hold fresh flowers. To date, I’ve used pitchers, ice buckets, coffee mugs, and tea pots & cups. I’ve even placed glass jars inside decorative boxes and paper bags. The next time someone brings you flowers, take a look around your home to see what might work…I know you’ll love the results.

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